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Bill Meyer Guest and Show Information for 7/18 to 7/29/22

Email Bill Meyer, Podcasts on BillMeyerShow.com

Bill Meyer’s Facebook page: www.Facebook.com/BillMeyerShow

MONDAY 07-25-22 PODCASTS 6AM7AM8AM

TUESDAY 07-26-22 PODCASTS 6AM7AM8AM

WEDNESDAY 07-27-22 PODCASTS 6AM7AM8AM

THURSDAY 07-28-22 PODCASTS 6AM7AM8AM

FRIDAY 07-22-22 PODCASTS 6AM7AM8AM

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Thursday 7-28-22 Bill Meyer Show Guest Information

 

6:35 Terry Jeffrey – Editor in Chief of CNS News www.CNSnews.com , a division of the Media Research Center www.MRC.org

 

 

Last week, the US House of Representatives passed the Respect for Marriage Act which repeals the Defense of Marriage Act passed in 1996 and would ensure that same sex and interracial marriages would be recognized by all states. 

 

Terry Jeffrey in his column this week recalls that then-Rep. Chuck Schumer of New York, then-Sen. Joe Biden of Delaware, and then-President Bill Clinton all supported DOMA. Some of these same people now support the Respect for Marriage Act. He writes:

 

(T)he House last week voted 267-157 to approve the so-called Respect for Marriage Act. It essentially repeals the Defense of Marriage Act, removing “provisions that define, for purposes of federal law, marriage as between a man and a woman” and “provisions that do not require states to recognize same-sex marriages from other states.” It has now been sent to the Senate, whose Democratic leader is Schumer—and, who like Clinton and Biden, once acted to defend traditional marriage.

​Terry is available for comment on this topic. If you would like to have him on your program, I would be happy to connect you. For more on Terry’s background and writing, please see below.

  

Terry pens a weekly column expertly covering a variety of issues for Creators Syndicate. His columns have appeared in Townhall, RealClearPolitics, and The Drudge Report among others. 

His latest work includes pieces on:

 

U.S. Trade Deficit with Russia

The Moral and Mortal Failures on the Southern Border 

How Government and Government and Public Prayer interact

The Role of Government and Displaying Religious Symbols in the Public Square

The Record Amount of Taxes Collected And Ever-Increasing Spending

 

Aside from his experience covering the news, Terry previously served as Political Advisor to Former GOP Presidential Candidate Pat Buchanan. 

 

 

7:10 Dr. Angie Farella, pediatrician from Webster, TX, and a speaker at the

WISE Event this Saturday at the Historic Ashland Armory, Buy tickets at the door as well as Eventbrite More at www.or.childrenshealthdefense.org

 

Dr. Angie Farella is also a pediatrician, resides in Texas, and will speak to the issues with the Covid Shots, particularly for kids, the experiences she had treating Covid, when other doctors failed to do so, and her work with Dr. Peter McCullough and others to raise awareness among Legislators nationwide concerning the dangers of the current covid vaccines as well as the suppression of successful early treatment strategies. 

 

8:10 Rob Schlapfer from www.RiseUpOregon.com and we continue the conversation about the Woke Jackson County Library Services, and what’s next.

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WILDFIRE MEETING CANCELLED (From state) – The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) is canceling the July 26 community information session scheduled in Grants Pass. The July 27 information session scheduled in Medford will now be a virtual meeting only. Anyone may attend the virtual session.

ODF’s information session in Grants Pass was canceled due to CONCERN FOR THE PHYSICAL SAFETY OF ATTENDEES and ODF EMPLOYEES. (Emphasis mine) The virtual meeting will be held through Zoom from 7-8 p.m. Wednesday, July 27. Join the meeting through this link: https://odf.zoom.us/j/97802419789.

(They’ll reschedule an in-person meeting in the future)

 

Remember, folks, ODF isn’t the Bad Guy…The Bad guys are the legislators who voted for this atrocious SB762.

 

Here’s how the voting went in the 2021 session:

 

Third reading. Carried by Golden. (!) Passed. Ayes, 22; Nays, 7–Boquist, Girod, Heard, Linthicum, Robinson, Thatcher, Thomsen; Excused, 1–Manning Jr. (Good for the 7, appears everyone else voted for it)

6-26 (H)            Rules suspended. Third reading. Carried by Marsh. (!) Passed. Ayes, 49; Nays, 6–Bonham, Breese-Iverson, Cate, Reschke, Stark, Wallan; Excused, 4–Hayden, Morgan, Smith G, Weber. (Good for the Nays, again, but all the others voted for it.)

 

Senator Golden and Rep. Marsh Carried the bill…the bill which is so controversial that they cancel the public input meetings??? 

 

Yes, Marsh and Golden need voted out BIG TIME.

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Wednesday 7-27-22 Bill Meyer Show Guest Information

 

6:10 – Epoch Times investigative reporter Joe Hanneman:

 

What actually took place in Washington D.C. on January 6, 2021? 

 

“The Real Story of January 6,” a new documentary from EpochTV and The Epoch Times, looks closely at the historic and tragic events that took place that winter’s day in 2021. 

 Trailer: https://www.youmaker.com/v/3Pz0DMKjeq8q 

“With in-depth interviews and exclusive video footage, we take an objective look at the issues, the people and the impacts of the events,” said Jasper Fakkert, editor-in-chief of The Epoch Times. 

 

  • The film examines the shooting death by police of Air Force veteran Ashli Babbitt, and it concludes that her death was unprovoked and the shooting unjustifiable. 

 

  • Author Julie Kelly offers some provocative observations and questions, including that she believes those behind January 6 want to “finish off” former President Donald Trump and the entire MAGA movement. 

 

  • The film interviews January 6 defendant Jake Lang, who says prosecutors are using pretrial detention, including solitary detention,to coerce defendants into accepting plea deals. 

 

  • Use-of-force expert Stan Kephart calls an alleged attack on apparently unconscious protester Rosanne Boyland by a police officer a “criminal act” that should be prosecuted. 

 

  • Protester Matt Perna hanged himself in the garage of his Pennsylvania home, seemingly after hearing federal prosecutors planned to seek prison time beyond his plea deal. The film talks with Geri Perna, Matt’s aunt, about the impact of his death on their family. 

7:25 Commissioner Colleen Roberts – Psycho Mushroom ordinance, yea or nay? Public Meeting at today’s County Meeting!

7:45 Jo County Commissioner Herman Baertschiger – continued talk on the horror of the SB762 “Wildfire Map” bill.

8:10 Brad Bennington, E.O. of the Builders Association of Southern Oregon, www.BuildSO.com and continuing conversation on SB762’s impact on property owners

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Tuesday 7-26-22 Bill Meyer Show Guest Information

 

7:10 Dr. Reni Moon, Spokane area pediatrician and one of the speakers at this Saturday’s “WISE” event, “Women, Integrity, Science, Evidence”. She’ll be talking about the psychological effects on children from the Covid regime, plus how it’s negatively impacted the medical field. and we talk of this Saturday’s “WISE” event all day at the Ashland Armory.  “Women, Integrity, Science, Evidence” featuring Dr. Naomi Wolf, Jennifer Margulis, Ph.D, Dr. Tyna Moore, Dr. Reneta Moon, and Stephanie Seneff, Ph.D.

Info and tickets at https://or.childrenshealthdefense.org/

 

 

7:35 Jo County Commissioner Herman Baertschiger – continued talk on the horror of the SB762 “Wildfire Map” bill.

 

8:35 Steve Yancey at Skypark Insurance (541-261-5444) – Received many listener inquiries about soaring insurance rates, and I invited Steve on to talk about what’s driving this.

T

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Monday 7-25-22 Bill Meyer Show Guest Information

 

 

7:10 Phoenix Mayor Terry Baker in studio discusses the issue of the City of Talent wishing to place most of its burned areas into Urban Renewal. Some big ramifications to other agencies if this happens.

 

7:45 Katherine Green, President of the Oregon Chapter of Children’s Health Defense Fund, and we talk of this Saturday’s “WISE” event all day at the Ashland Armory.  “Women, Integrity, Science, Evidence”  featuring Dr. Naomi Wolf, Jennifer Margulis, Ph.D, Dr. Tyna Moore, Dr. Reneta Moon, and Stephanie Seneff, Ph.D.

Info and tickets at https://or.childrenshealthdefense.org/

 

 

 

8:15 Dr. Dennis Powers, “Where Past Meets Present” – www.DennisPowersBooks.com

 

Shady Cove

By Dennis Powers

Dating back to the mid-1800s, passersby described the shady covefrom which the town derived its name–as a shelter where weary travelers could rest from the hot sun. This river bend is located 300 yards upstream from the present Highway 62 bridge in town, and the name then was descriptive, not an official name. It isn’t known precisely when folks started referring to the bend as the “cove” or “shady cove.”

The place was also where people stayed while waiting for the ferry at a nearby river crossing. Before bridges were built, folks crossed the Rogue this way, whether it was to commute between the gold camps at Jacksonville and John Day in Eastern Oregon, or to travel between Trail and Eagle Point. 

In the early 1900s, two developers built a home and vacation cabins at the cove, and they were the first to officially use the name in their recorded map. Area residents came to spend their summertime while enjoying the river away from the summer’s heat. Over time, however, the cabins were abandoned, pathways washed away, and vegetation took over the beach. 

As with most Rogue Valley communities, the economy depended on the timber industry. With it being on a main access to Crater Lake–which is 60 miles away–tourists naturally passed by or stayed at the town. As timbering moneys diminished, it became more of a tourist and retiree destination. The town grew as newcomers replaced the loggers and suppliers to the industry.

In 1964, however, the disastrous Rogue River flood nearly destroyed it. After five days of heavy rains and snowmelt, the swollen river rose over its banks on the night of December 22nd. The raging waters hit Shady Cove almost the hardest. The flood and mudslides destroyed numerous homes, stately pine trees, the original bridge crossing, the saw mill adjacent to the bridge, and other structures, as tons of heavy mill-logs and rooftops surged past to crush downstream houses. The town was totally dark as power was out, but everyone could hear the river’s roar and debris crashing. The town rebuilt, but this took time.  

Shady Cove incorporated in 1972, taking the name for the cove that was a natural shelter for those passing through. Led by Faye Thompson, the city embarked on a beautification project to make the town “shady with trees.” The U.S. Forest Service donated Evergreen seedlings that were planted throughout in returning the place to its pre-1964 flood days. Owing to this, people now see fifty-year-old Pine trees that stand tall.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for flood control in 1977 completed construction of the William Jess Dam and Lost Creek Lake, a reservoir nine miles north of Shady Cove with the Rogue River continuing downstream. The U.S. Army Corps also built the Cole M. River Fish Hatchery, one of the largest in the Western states just downstream of the dam. With the recreational draws of the lake and adjacent parks, the town had another attraction for residents and newcomers alike.

With RV parks, close-by camping facilities, motels, and different parks, Shady Cove has found its niche as a tourist destination. With the magnificent Rogue River running through the city limits, it has found its place.

Sources: Dennis Powers, Where Past Meets Present, Ashland, Oregon: Hellgate Press, 2017 (“Shady Cove,” Pp. 401-403); Mail Tribune, “Where is the ‘shady cove’ in Shady Cove?”, April 22, 2007.

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MONDAY 07-18-22 PODCASTS 6AM7AM8AM

TUESDAY 07-19-22 PODCASTS 6AM7AM8AM

WEDNESDAY 07-20-22 PODCASTS 6AM7AM8AM

THURSDAY 07-21-22 PODCASTS 6AM7AM8AM

FRIDAY 07-22-22 PODCASTS 6AM7AM8AM

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Friday 7-22-22 Bill Meyer Show Guest Information

 

 

6:35 Rick Manning, president of Americans For Limited Government, www.DailyTorch.com

Rick and I discuss several issues including the Covid Vax could bounce out one-fourth of the ARMY. How insane is that?

https://dailytorch.com/2022/07/bidens-looming-purge-of-27-percent-of-the-army-partially-vaccinated-against-covid-will-take-years-to-recover-from-threatens-national-security/

                                   

 

7:10 Outdoor Report with Greg Roberts

 

8:15 Robert H. Bork Jr., President of the Antitrust Education Project https://www.antitrusteducationproject.org/

 

Should the Right use antitrust law to break up Big Tech in order to break up “Cancel Culture”? Robert H. Bork Jr. gives an emphatic “NO”, and we discuss the issue.

He’s written the forward to a new printing of his late father’s (Judge Robert H. Bork) book

The Antitrust Paradox Hardcover – April 12, 2021

by Robert H Bork (Author), Mike Lee (Introduction), Robert H. Bork Jr.(Foreword)

 

Since it first appeared in 1978, this seminal work by one of the foremost American legal minds of our age has dramatically changed the way the courts view government’s role in private affairs. Now reissued with a new introduction and foreword, this classic shows how antitrust suits adversely affect the consumer by encouraging a costly form of protection for inefficient and uncompetitive small businesses. Robert Bork’s view of antitrust law has had a profound impact on how the law has been both interpreted and applied. Lucid, highly readable, and full of rich social and political implications, The Antitrust Paradox illustrates how the purpose and integrity of law can be subverted by those who do not understand the reality law addresses or who seek to make it serve unintended political and social ends.

https://www.amazon.com/Antitrust-Paradox-Robert-H-Bork/dp/1736089706/ref=sr_1_2?crid=PIT6KPII3WXM&keywords=Robert+Bork+junior&qid=1658279432&sprefix=robert+bork+junior%2Caps%2C65&sr=8-2

 

 

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Thursday 7-21-22 Bill Meyer Show Guest Information

 

 

6:35 Jackson County Republican Party Chair Randall Embertson – You’re invited to their open house 3-6pm Friday 8/5. At the office fundraiser they’re auctioning off a SIG 10mm pistol. ($10/ticket)

We discuss their recent election resolution:

 

Jackson County Republican Party RESOLUTION

 July 8th, 2022

Be it resolved by the JCRP Executive Committee:

WHEREAS In solidarity with the Texas GOP Convention and their recent Resolution on the 2020 Election;

WHEREAS We believe the 2020 Election violated Article 1 and 2 of the US Constitution, that various secretaries of state illegally circumvented their state legislatures in conducting their elections in multiple incorrect ways, including allowing ballots to be received after November 3, 2020;

WHEREAS The 2000 Mules Documentary irrefutably proves election fraud occurred during the 2020 Election in the form of ballot trafficking through drop boxes;

WHEREAS We believe that substantial election fraud in key metropolitan areas significantly affected the results in five key states in favor of Joseph Robinette Biden Jr.;

WHEREAS Audits of the 2020 Election found significant inconsistencies and discrepancies;

NOW, THEREFORE, We reject the certified results of the 2020 Presidential election, and we hold that acting President Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. was not legitimately elected by the people of the United States. We strongly urge all Republicans to work to ensure election integrity and correct all fraud and weaknesses identified in the 2020 Election.

This resolution was presented and passed by the JCRP Executive Committee on the 8th of July 2022, and was presented to and adopted by the JCRP Central Committee on the 12th of July, 2022.

Done at the City of Medford, Oregon this eighth day of July in the year of our Lord twenty thousand and twenty-two and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-sixth.

 

 

 

7:35 Kevin Starrett with Oregon Firearms Federation – A LOT to cover today, and a deep dive into the initiative petition on the ballot in November.

GUN BAN MEASURE APPROVED FOR BALLOT, COMMENTS NEEDED

 

 

8:45 OPEN FOR BUSINESS, Steve Johnson, Steve The Goldsmith at QuikFix Jewelry repair in the Rogue Valley Mall. https://quikfixrvm.com/

 

 

Open 11 to 7 seven days a week. Call 541 690-1388

 

We are doing repairs, in most cases watch batteries and watch band adjustments are while you wait.

The design center has been proving to be a perfect addition, customers can see the grades, specifications, and close up photos of pieces in larger than life proportions 

on the flat screen.  We have added a microscope that broadcasts to the big screen to help with diamond selection.

We have welcomed a couple of additional goldsmiths to our band of merry men and women so collectively we have a huge amount of experience in the jewelry arts in repair as well as design and importing.

As an added benefit from the years of experience I have, I am blessed with good friends who are stone cutters and polishers  and can provide whatever expertise is required by our clients.

And we will have a Laser in our bag of tricks fairly soon – it’s on the way.

There are advantages to the laser that make life much easier for us, and less expensive for our customers you can ask me how.

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Wednesday 7-20-22 Bill Meyer Show Guest Information

 6:35 Eric Peters, automotive journalist at www.EpAutos.com and here are some of his articles we discuss, great stuff:

The “Withholding” Tax You Pay by the Mile

 

The 2022 Toyota Camry

 

Once We Were Interested…

 

 

7:10 Jackson County Commissioner Colleen Roberts – What about the ODF fire mapping?

 

7:35 Rob Schlapfer – www.RiseUpOregon.com

Tonight is the Jackson County Library Services board meeting – a lot to talk about. More at the Rise Up Oregon website.

 

 

8:45 OPEN FOR BUSINESS with Ken McLean, Community Relations Director of Prestige Senior Living Arbor Place

To learn more about the connection between physical and cognitive health, our team here at Prestige Senior Living Arbor Place is hosting a free webinar with neuroscientist and aging expert Dr. Rob Winningham on Tuesday, July 26 at 2 p.m.

-In the webinar he will present on the topic of body and brain health for older adults. If you or a loved one is interested in learning more, you won’t want to miss it. 

-To register for the free webinar, visit www.prestigecanhelp.com

 

 

Ken McLean

Community Relations Director

Prestige Senior Living Arbor Place

3150 Juanipero Way  •  Medford, Oregon 97504
Office: 541-773-5380  

Fax: 541-773-5378

ken.mclean@prestigecare.com
www.PrestigeCare.com

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Tuesday 7-19-22 Bill Meyer Show Guest Information

 

 

6:50 Robert Lamm of the Rock Group Chicago,

 

CHICAGO: BORN FOR THIS MOMENT – 2022 ALBUM BIO

It’s truly rare for a band to forge a musical legacy so indelibly ingrained into the public’s consciousness that their name alone is synonymous with the sounds they create. Chicago is one such band. Their unique blend of personally relatable songwriting based on real life experiences, multilayered harmonic vocalizations, and world-class brass arrangements has fostered a singular style of songcraft that has been electrifying audiences across the globe for over six decades and counting. To that end, Chicago’s forthcoming 38th album, Born for This Moment – set for release on July 8, 2022, via BMG – serves to enhance the band’s hallowed recorded heritage to the nth degree.

ROBERT LAMM BIO

http://chicagotheband.com/robert-lamm/

 

7:35 Josephine County Commissioner Baertschiger talks Biden, political news, the options for funding the Sheriffs Department. They’ll be deciding an option in August that they’ll refer to voters.

 

 

8:15 Ed, community researcher “Mr. X” with a conversation on the need to comment to our elected leaders, including our county commissioners, city councils, state representatives and senators, State A.G. and Secretary of State,  about the incredible intrusion and abuse being heaped upon us by the DLCD pushing the “Climate Friendly Equitable Communities” rules. These are the same rules that Brad Bennington talked about on the show yesterday. (His group’s letter on www.PeopleForAnAffordableOregon.com is one you can sign. But more needs to be done. Here are some articles and information for you to read and understand, and then get busy. SB762 requires public input, but there’s already been a short public comment period now expired, and this Thursday the DLCD is planning to enact 100+ development rules based on this garbage, won’t answer development questions, and essentially (and illegally, imo) shutting the people out of this process.

 

Some Oregon landowners say new wildfire risk map is inaccurate | KTVL

https://katu.com/news/politics/bipartisan-agreement-reached-in-big-oregon-wildfire-bill-passes-senate

https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Measures/Overview/SB762

https://olis.oregonlegislature.gov/liz/2021R1/Downloads/MeasureDocument/SB762/Enrolled

*****    https://www.oregon.gov/lcd/NH/Documents/20220517_WAC_Stakeholder_Group_Meeting_2_Summary.pdf

https://today.oregonstate.edu/news/oregon-state-scientists-collaborate-road-map-adapting-dry-forests-new-fire-regimes

“CORVALLIS, Ore. – Oregon State University scientists and collaborators from throughout the West say that thinning and prescribed burning are crucial parts of adaptive management for seasonally dry, fire-dependent forests such as those east of the Cascade crest.

In a paper published this week in Ecological Applications, Andrew Merschel, James Johnston and Meg Krawchuk of the OSU College of Forestry also join other researchers in acknowledging the role of Indigenous fire stewardship in past and present landscapes and the value of restoring that stewardship – intentional low-severity burning that reduces fuels and is important culturally.”

“Exceptionally hot, dry weather has already fueled dozens of fires across the west in 2021, including the 400,000-acre Bootleg fire in south central Oregon,” said Krawchuk, a forest ecologist who has been researching approaches for societal adaptation to fire for years. “A hundred years of federal policy that prevented regular surface fires in these forests has led to forests that are too dense and packed with brush and allow fires to ignite and spread easily. Our team wants to give land managers and others across the region a clear picture of the best available science and how they can use it to make good decisions about managing landscapes.””

https://today.oregonstate.edu/archives/2017/apr/new-era-western-wildfire-demands-new-ways-protect-people-ecosystems

scientists say this also means accepting wildfire as an inevitable part of the landscape.

“Wildfire is catching up to us,” said lead author Tania Schoennagel, a research scientist at the University of Colorado-Boulder’s Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research. “We’re learning our old tools aren’t enough and we need to approach wildfire differently.”

The western United States has seen a 2-degree-Celsius rise in annual average temperature and lengthening of the fire season by almost three months since the 1970s. Both elements contribute to what the authors refer to as the “new era of western wildfires.” This pattern of bigger, hotter fires, along with the influx of homes into fire-prone areas — more than 2 million since 1990 — has made wildfire vastly more costly and dangerous.

“For a long time, we’ve thought that if we try harder and do better, we can get ahead of wildfire and reduce the risks,” said Schoennagel. “We can no longer do that. This is bigger than us, and we’re going to have to adapt to wildfire rather than the other way around.”

As part of this adaptation process, the authors advocate for actions that may be unpopular, such as allowing more fires to burn largely unimpeded in wildland areas and intentionally setting more fires, or “controlled burns,” to reduce natural fuels like undergrowth in more developed areas. Both these steps would reduce future risk and help ecosystems adapt to increasing wildfire and warming.

They also argue for reforming federal, state and local policies that have the unintended consequence of encouraging people to develop in fire-prone areas. Currently, federal taxpayers pick up the tab for preventing and fighting western wildfires, a cost that has reached some $2 billion a year. If states and counties were to bear more of that cost, it would provide incentive to adopt planning efforts and fire-resistant building codes that would reduce risk.

visual  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZOoYo4KSnU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IodMD3cKnEQ

listen

@ 1:33–1:34:50–1:35.57

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IodMD3cKnEQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFABumGXdCA

 

 

https://today.oregonstate.edu/archives/2017/apr/new-era-western-wildfire-demands-new-ways-protect-people-ecosystems

scientists say this also means accepting wildfire as an inevitable part of the landscape.

“Wildfire is catching up to us,” said lead author Tania Schoennagel, a research scientist at the University of Colorado-Boulder’s Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research. “We’re learning our old tools aren’t enough and we need to approach wildfire differently.”

The western United States has seen a 2-degree-Celsius rise in annual average temperature and lengthening of the fire season by almost three months since the 1970s. Both elements contribute to what the authors refer to as the “new era of western wildfires.” This pattern of bigger, hotter fires, along with the influx of homes into fire-prone areas — more than 2 million since 1990 — has made wildfire vastly more costly and dangerous.

“For a long time, we’ve thought that if we try harder and do better, we can get ahead of wildfire and reduce the risks,” said Schoennagel. “We can no longer do that. This is bigger than us, and we’re going to have to adapt to wildfire rather than the other way around.”

As part of this adaptation process, the authors advocate for actions that may be unpopular, such as allowing more fires to burn largely unimpeded in wildland areas and intentionally setting more fires, or “controlled burns,” to reduce natural fuels like undergrowth in more developed areas. Both these steps would reduce future risk and help ecosystems adapt to increasing wildfire and warming.

They also argue for reforming federal, state and local policies that have the unintended consequence of encouraging people to develop in fire-prone areas. Currently, federal taxpayers pick up the tab for preventing and fighting western wildfires, a cost that has reached some $2 billion a year. If states and counties were to bear more of that cost, it would provide incentive to adopt planning efforts and fire-resistant building codes that would reduce risk.

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Monday 7-18-22 Bill Meyer Show Guest Information

 

7:10 Brad Bennington, Executive officer of the Builders Association of Southern Oregon

  www.buildso.com

LCDC plans to adopt final CFEC rules without public input

 

The final hearing for the DLCD’s Climate Friendly Equitable Communities rules takes place on July 21st. There, the state is looking to adopt permanent CFEC rules with additional changes. To make matters worse, the commission is adopting new rules without allowing public comment on the changes they intend to make to our communities.

 

The rules are likely to have major impacts on Oregonians, such as:

 

    New costs for small businesses

    Increased housing costs

    Limits on iconic Oregon business, such as coffee stands

    More congestion in our cities

    Less accessible streets

    Impacts to existing and future local plans

 

Despite these major impacts and changes to the rules, the state is not allowing public input on the final draft. No verbal or written testimony will be allowed on the final rules before adoption on July 21.

 

OHBA is partnering with People for an Affordable Oregon to ask the state to take public comment not move forward with adoption until all questions are answered and Oregonians have had the opportunity to weigh in on the final rules.

 

WE NEED YOUR HELP.

 

Sign on to make sure you have had a final say on the CFEC rules.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN ON.

 

7:35 Dr. Naomi Wolf, www.DailyClout.io and author of “The Bodies of Others”. Dr. Wolf is here in southern Oregon Saturday, July 30th at the Ashland Armory, and we talk about the book and the event, tickets here: https://or.childrenshealthdefense.org/

 

Make sure to order Dr. Naomi Wolf’s ‘The Bodies of Others: The New Authoritarians, COVID-19 and The War Against the Human’: HERE.]

 

 

8:15 Dr. Dennis Powers, retired professor of Business Law at Southern Oregon University – www.DennisPowersBooks.com with today’s “Where Past Meets Present”.

 

Yreka: Pioneer Mining Town

By Dennis Powers

 

The early-1851 discovery of gold 30 miles south of present-day Yreka on the Scott River attracted miners from all directions. In that March, Abraham Thompson–a mule-train packer from Oregon–was leading six men across the Siskiyou Trail to that find. A heavy rainstorm caused the men to camp on the “flats,” one-quarter mile from what’s now downtown Yreka.

Prospectors before had found little gold there, and the group would soon leave. This time, the heavy rains had deeply soaked the ground. While watching his pack mules the next morning pull out branch grass by their roots to eat, he was surprised to see flecks of gold on the roots. The group decided to stay there and dig for the precious metal.

The gold was there in large quantities, and the word soon went out that this discovery was “the richest square mile on earth.” By May, some 2000 miners lived in tent camps, shanties, and a few rough cabins on the flats and searching for the gold at “Thompson’s Dry Diggings.” By August 1851, 5000 peopleprimarily miners but with dry-good merchants and a few familieswere camped at Shasta Butte City, Yreka’s present location, to be closer to the nearest water supply at Yreka Creek. They believed that this area was the “second mother lode.” 

With the continual mining and commercial activity, residents began building wooden structures on Main Street, now named Miner Street. About one year after the gold discovery, the California legislature created Siskiyou County. Adjacent to the Oregon border, this would be the fifth largest California county by area, and include towns such as Yreka, Mt. Shasta, Weed, Dunsmuir, McCloud, and the Klamath River corridor. 

As another town was also called Shasta in the area, the city changed its name to Yreka, which was the local Indian name for Mt. Shasta that meant “North Mountain.” The famous “Poet of the West,” Joaquin Miller, described Yreka during 1853-54 as a lively place with “a tide of people up and down and across other streets, as strong as if in New York.”

In a few years, Yreka changed from another boisterous gold-rush town into a permanent city with laws and governance. Stage lines from and to Oregon used it as a primary stage stop. With a courthouse built, along with the first hospital, church, and school, Yreka was selected to be the county seat for Siskiyou County.

The legendary Lotta Crabtree began her career in these Northern California gold-rush towns and performed in the Yreka area during the mid-1850s, frequently at the Arcade Saloon on Miner Street. According to these stories, the lonely miners threw “thousands of dollars” worth of gold nuggets onto the stage after a performance. With a sense of permanence, the town incorporated in April 1857.

As typical with other mining towns, however, when the gold played out, many of the miners, merchants, and their families left. In twenty years, its population was only 1,100 hardy folks. On July 4th, 1871, the bad times continued when a fire consumed most of the business district in its fiery destruction of thirteen blocks, including many stores, a hotel, theatre, all of the livery stables, the Catholic Church, a schoolhouse, and numerous residences. Despite this huge setback, the town people came together and rebuilt; this also brought about the numerous brick buildings that today line Miner and other Yreka streets. A short-line railroad in 1889 then connected the city with the Southern Pacific’s West Coast line.

As farming, timbering, and ranching replaced mining, the city started growing again. In 1941, Yreka came to national prominence as the temporary state capital for the State of Jefferson. With neighboring counties in Oregon and California feeling disenfranchised from their state governments, the succession movement began there. Outside of Yreka, armed men erected roadblocks every Thursday on Highway 99 and handed out their “Proclamation of Independence” before letting drivers continue on. When in a matter of weeks the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, the movement came to a quick end.

The downtown along West Miner Street is now listed as an historic district on the National Register of Historic Places and as a California Historical Landmark. Over seventy, pre-1900 homes (with numerous stately Victorians) still stand, all within a few blocks of the downtown. With tourism and recreational interests joining Yreka’s economic base, it has 7,750 residents today and is the most populated city in Siskiyou County.

Starting from a group of six grizzled men, Yreka has grown over time to become much more than a stagecoach stop.

Sources: Western Mining History: Yreka, California at History (with images); City of Yreka: History,” at More History; “City of Yreka: Fast Facts,” at Fast Facts

8:40 – Open For Business with Matt Duste from Dusty’s Transmissions https://dustystransmissions.com/

We discuss their services, how they’ve grown, and are THE major source of quality rebuilt transmissions in the STATE.

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